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Mike Hull
Mike Hull

DEMONOID IS BACK!!



Demonoid prohibits linking to torrents containing pornographic material and malicious software. In addition to forums, the website features an IRC channel, #demonoid at P2P-Network, which supports discussion among users.[citation needed]




DEMONOID IS BACK!!



A few months ago, the site administrator (known as Deimos), lacked the time necessary to maintain this website. For personal reasons, Deimos decided to resign his position as a member of the site staff. Before leaving, Deimos picked a new site administrator from among his friends. The old moderator team remained unchanged and will continue helping with the site. The Demonoid team will try to keep everything running just as it always has been. The trackers and website seem to be working properly, and should any issues arise, they will be taken care of as soon as possible. If we work on any problems over the next few days, the site might be going on and offline. We apologize in advance if this should happen. Welcome back and enjoy!


In a 2007 study, Slyck.com found twelve cease and desist letters to users of Demonoid.[17] On September 25, 2007, the Demonoid website, forums and trackers went offline.[18][19] They came back four days later with the exception of the website, which came back the day after. Over the next few days, the website continued experiencing intermittent downtime[20] until October 2, 2007. The explanation as widely speculated[21] was that they had received a letter from a lawyer for the Canadian Recording Industry Association threatening legal action.[20] Demonoid began blocking Canadian traffic,[22] a strategy similar to that taken by isoHunt and TorrentSpy in blocking American traffic to avoid RIAA complaints.[20][23] Visitors from Canadian-based IPs would be redirected to the downtime version of the website, which contained an explanation of the legal threats. However, it was still possible for Canadians to visit the website at that time using proxy servers. Additionally, while the website may have been blocked in Canada at the time, the tracker was still readily accepting Canadian IP addresses.[citation needed]


On November 9, 2007, the site again went offline, reportedly due to legal threats to their service provider from the Canadian Recording Industry Association. A placeholder page stated, "The CRIA threatened the company renting the servers to us, and because of this it is not possible to keep the site online. Sorry for the inconvenience and thanks for your understanding." According to the IRC channel, the trackers themselves were not affected.[22] Six days later, the placeholder page was updated with a link to a new forum, unrelated to file sharing, for the community. On November 29, 2007, Deimos posted on that forum a problem preventing the site from coming back up:


On November 12, 2012, demonoid.me began resolving to an IP address based in Hong Kong, where a tracker was operating.[34] The tracker did not accept new torrents, but honored existing ones. However, the website and forums remained offline. The tracker went offline on December 15, 2012, first actively refusing all connections, and then becoming unreachable when demonoid.me's DNS servers went down.[35]


In November 2013, demonoid.me and demonoid.ph started redirecting to demonoid.com, whose website began displaying a page that hints at a possible comeback of the site, with the message "We will rebuild! Coming back soon, please check back later. Thanks for your visit!!" along with a Bitcoin donation link.[36] On January 9, 2014, a tracker came online at inferno.demonoid.com and quickly became one of the five busiest BitTorrent trackers on the Internet; in only a few hours, the tracker was coordinating the communication of 1.3 million people scattered across 388,321 torrent files.[37]


In March 2014, after 20 months of downtime, the Demonoid BitTorrent tracker came back online. Former users were still able to use their login details, and most of the old torrents were still listed on the site. In July 2018, Demonoid stopped working on all used domains. The issues are related to server-side problems. There are no backups or mirrors on the internet.[38]


On May 7, 2013, d2, an unofficial website based on Demonoid's databases went live at d2.vu, with hosting provided by the U.S.-based service RamNode. Around November 2013, a website showing the Demonoid logo and saying "We will rebuild!" came online at the .com domain, and the .me and .ph domains began redirecting web traffic to it, indicating they are all under control of the same owner. In January 2014, a tracker came online at the .com domain and provided service for the old torrents. On March 29, 2014, Demonoid came back online at the demonoid.ph domain. On December 3, 2014 domain name was changed to demonoid.pw.[citation needed]


On February 17, 2019 an official statement was made stating that ownership of demonoid.pw was lost and to avoid visiting it.[41] In August 2019, Demonoid came back online at dnoid.to with registrations open intermittently.[42]


Based on a Demonoid backup, d2 contained Demonoid's torrent and user databases. All previously registered Demonoid users were able to log in using their already existing Demonoid accounts, while new invite codes were being generated. Unlike Demonoid, d2 had no user forums, and to minimize legal risk, the site had no torrent tracker; all torrents instead used public trackers. RamNode eventually terminated d2's hosting and, in August 2013, d2.vu was hosted on a server in Sweden.[44] d2 closed on March 30, 2014 when Demonoid went back up.[citation needed]


Demonoid's administrator has promised to bring the site back after it was taken down by a massive Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attack. The tracker has already been down for more than a week, and there still is no date for when to expect its return.


"I don't plan on shutting down, but if Im going to fix it I have to do it properly," the administrator told TorrentFreak. "That means upgrading a lot of our 7 year old hardware and maybe bringing up the beta only. You know how it goes with demonoid. It might take a while but it will come back."


Earlier this week, the server was turned off completely and the site led to a dead end. Then it came back to life and started redirecting to random sites full of advertisements. Eventually this stopped and both demonoid.me and demonoid.ph went back to not responding.


Founded in 2003, Demonoid rose to become the largest public torrent tracker by 2005. In 2018, right before closing, it was said to have over 10 million registered users. Demonoid was packed with lots of quality movies, games, music, software, and much more, which forced us to keep coming back for more.


Woo, exciting day for torrenters around the globe. Demonoid was one of the largest file sharing sites before it got taken down more than a a year. So after that year of down time, both the website and torrent tracker are back online.


  • Bio-mechanical demonoidNameBio-mechanical demonoidAlt. namesCyber-demonoidDistinctionCyborg/human/demon hybridsAffiliation314 ProjectRelatedCyborgPowersStrength

  • Durability

AppearancesDebut"A New Man"Last seen"Primeval"


Bio-mechanical demonoid was the term Adam used to describe himself, as the prototype for a race of supersoldiers created by Maggie Walsh. These beings were part of the 314 Project: build a creature that combined the superior strength of demons, the advancement of technology, and the intelligence and adaptability of humans into one being.[1]


Bio-mechanical demonoids possessed physical abilities notably superior to those of most vampires, demons and Slayers. However, they did not possess any magical abilities and were vulnerable to such, as demonstrated by the use of the enjoining spell by the Scooby Gang.[2]


Finally the guys behind the little devil made it. There are back online, according to an article by torrentfreak, they are now based in Russia. Will it be their save haven? Lets all sit back and watch. Those who already have a Demonoid account, Leech and Seed the best you can!!! Let the community kick back to life again.


Many Indexes were relying on demonoid for tracking their torrents. For instance, ebookshare was tracking its torrents on demonoid and shifted to the piratebay after the demons went offline. I have been leeching on its public trackers often and I had experienced much of good download rates. At times I even maxed out my connection. Considering how much my ISP sucks. (sorry the people being the server screens, the truth hurts, I know :P)


The classic argument Marxists make against anarchism is that anarchists can never organise to overthrow anything and fail at the last moment. Anarchists argue that Marxists institutionalise repression and never move beyond the State. Both have a point. Pirarchy forms and supports accidental rebellion, while providing support for institutionalised moves. In its habits, it recognises that property always comes from a collective commons; the origin of all property is the natural world, cultural ideas, social labour, individual effort and contingency. In pirarchy people attempt to rule themselves through informal exchange, conversation, collaboration and fragmentation. They resent attempts to stop the exchange. By taking back the cultural into their own lives, they challenge the appropriation at the heart of capitalism using the tools and formations of capitalism, while capitalism, in turn, attempts to reappropriate and extend property claims.


The popular torrent tracker Demonoid is back online throughout much of the world after the site, rendered inaccessible by copyright enforcers, relocated to a new, as-yet-blocked URL. The move comes mere weeks after KickAss Torrents also quietly switched to a new URL in an attempt to stay one st


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